Elixir v1.8.0-dev Code View Source

Utilities for managing code compilation, code evaluation, and code loading.

This module complements Erlang's :code module to add behaviour which is specific to Elixir. Almost all of the functions in this module have global side effects on the behaviour of Elixir.

Working with files

This module contains three functions for compiling and evaluating files. Here is a summary of them and their behaviour:

  • require_file/2 - compiles a file and tracks its name. It does not compile the file again if it has been previously required.

  • compile_file/2 - compiles a file without tracking its name. Compiles the file multiple times when invoked multiple times.

  • eval_file/2 - evaluates the file contents without tracking its name. It returns the result of the last expression in the file, instead of the modules defined in it.

In a nutshell, the first must be used when you want to keep track of the files handled by the system, to avoid the same file from being compiled multiple times. This is common in scripts.

compile_file/2 must be used when you are interested in the modules defined in a file, without tracking. eval_file/2 should be used when you are interested in the result of evaluating the file rather than the modules it defines.

Link to this section Summary

Functions

Appends a path to the end of the Erlang VM code path list

Returns a list with the available compiler options

Compiles the given file

Compiles the quoted expression

Compiles the given string

Gets the compilation options from the code server

Sets compilation options

Deletes a path from the Erlang VM code path list. This is the list of directories the Erlang VM uses for finding module code

Ensures the given module is compiled and loaded

Ensures the given module is compiled and loaded

Ensures the given module is loaded

Ensures the given module is loaded

Evaluates the quoted contents

Evaluates the contents given by string

Returns the docs for the given module or path to .beam file

Formats the given code string

Deprecated function to retrieve old documentation format

Prepends a path to the beginning of the Erlang VM code path list

Purge compiler modules

Requires the given file

Lists all required files

Converts the given string to its quoted form

Converts the given string to its quoted form

Removes files from the required files list

Link to this section Functions

Link to this function

append_path(path) View Source
append_path(Path.t()) :: true | {:error, :bad_directory}

Appends a path to the end of the Erlang VM code path list.

This is the list of directories the Erlang VM uses for finding module code.

The path is expanded with Path.expand/1 before being appended. If this path does not exist, an error is returned.

Examples

Code.append_path(".")
#=> true

Code.append_path("/does_not_exist")
#=> {:error, :bad_directory}
Link to this function

available_compiler_options() View Source
available_compiler_options() :: [atom()]

Returns a list with the available compiler options.

See compiler_options/1 for more information.

Examples

iex> Code.available_compiler_options()
[:docs, :debug_info, :ignore_module_conflict, :relative_paths, :warnings_as_errors]
Link to this function

compile_file(file, relative_to \\ nil) View Source
compile_file(binary(), nil | binary()) :: [{module(), binary()}]

Compiles the given file.

Accepts relative_to as an argument to tell where the file is located.

Returns a list of tuples where the first element is the module name and the second one is its bytecode (as a binary). Opposite to require_file/2, it does not track the filename of the compiled file.

If you would like to get the result of evaluating file rather than the modules defined in it, see eval_file/2.

For compiling many files concurrently, see Kernel.ParallelCompiler.compile/2.

Link to this function

compile_quoted(quoted, file \\ "nofile") View Source
compile_quoted(Macro.t(), binary()) :: [{module(), binary()}]

Compiles the quoted expression.

Returns a list of tuples where the first element is the module name and the second one is its bytecode (as a binary). A file can be given as second argument which will be used for reporting warnings and errors.

Link to this function

compile_string(string, file \\ "nofile") View Source
compile_string(List.Chars.t(), binary()) :: [{module(), binary()}]

Compiles the given string.

Returns a list of tuples where the first element is the module name and the second one is its bytecode (as a binary). A file can be given as second argument which will be used for reporting warnings and errors.

Warning: string can be any Elixir code and code can be executed with the same privileges as the Erlang VM: this means that such code could compromise the machine (for example by executing system commands). Don't use compile_string/2 with untrusted input (such as strings coming from the network).

Link to this function

compiler_options() View Source
compiler_options() :: %{optional(atom()) => boolean()}

Gets the compilation options from the code server.

Check compiler_options/1 for more information.

Examples

Code.compiler_options()
#=> %{debug_info: true, docs: true,
#=>   warnings_as_errors: false, ignore_module_conflict: false}
Link to this function

compiler_options(opts) View Source
compiler_options(Enumerable.t()) :: %{optional(atom()) => boolean()}

Sets compilation options.

These options are global since they are stored by Elixir's Code Server.

Available options are:

  • :docs - when true, retain documentation in the compiled module. Defaults to true.

  • :debug_info - when true, retain debug information in the compiled module. This allows a developer to reconstruct the original source code. Defaults to false.

  • :ignore_module_conflict - when true, override modules that were already defined without raising errors. Defaults to false.

  • :relative_paths - when true, use relative paths in quoted nodes, warnings and errors generated by the compiler. Note disabling this option won't affect runtime warnings and errors. Defaults to true.

  • :warnings_as_errors - causes compilation to fail when warnings are generated. Defaults to false.

It returns the new map of compiler options.

Examples

Code.compiler_options(debug_info: true)
#=> %{debug_info: true, docs: true,
#=>   warnings_as_errors: false, ignore_module_conflict: false}
Link to this function

delete_path(path) View Source
delete_path(Path.t()) :: boolean()

Deletes a path from the Erlang VM code path list. This is the list of directories the Erlang VM uses for finding module code.

The path is expanded with Path.expand/1 before being deleted. If the path does not exist, this function returns false.

Examples

Code.prepend_path(".")
Code.delete_path(".")
#=> true

Code.delete_path("/does_not_exist")
#=> false
Link to this function

ensure_compiled(module) View Source
ensure_compiled(module()) ::
  {:module, module()}
  | {:error, :embedded | :badfile | :nofile | :on_load_failure}

Ensures the given module is compiled and loaded.

If the module is already loaded, it works as no-op. If the module was not loaded yet, it checks if it needs to be compiled first and then tries to load it.

If it succeeds in loading the module, it returns {:module, module}. If not, returns {:error, reason} with the error reason.

Check ensure_loaded/1 for more information on module loading and when to use ensure_loaded/1 or ensure_compiled/1.

Link to this function

ensure_compiled?(module) View Source
ensure_compiled?(module()) :: boolean()

Ensures the given module is compiled and loaded.

Similar to ensure_compiled/1, but returns true if the module is already loaded or was successfully loaded and compiled. Returns false otherwise.

Link to this function

ensure_loaded(module) View Source
ensure_loaded(module()) ::
  {:module, module()}
  | {:error, :embedded | :badfile | :nofile | :on_load_failure}

Ensures the given module is loaded.

If the module is already loaded, this works as no-op. If the module was not yet loaded, it tries to load it.

If it succeeds in loading the module, it returns {:module, module}. If not, returns {:error, reason} with the error reason.

Code loading on the Erlang VM

Erlang has two modes to load code: interactive and embedded.

By default, the Erlang VM runs in interactive mode, where modules are loaded as needed. In embedded mode the opposite happens, as all modules need to be loaded upfront or explicitly.

Therefore, this function is used to check if a module is loaded before using it and allows one to react accordingly. For example, the URI module uses this function to check if a specific parser exists for a given URI scheme.

ensure_compiled/1

Elixir also contains an ensure_compiled/1 function that is a superset of ensure_loaded/1.

Since Elixir's compilation happens in parallel, in some situations you may need to use a module that was not yet compiled, therefore it can't even be loaded.

When invoked, ensure_compiled/1 halts the compilation of the caller until the module given to ensure_compiled/1 becomes available or all files for the current project have been compiled. If compilation finishes and the module is not available, an error tuple is returned.

ensure_compiled/1 does not apply to dependencies, as dependencies must be compiled upfront.

In most cases, ensure_loaded/1 is enough. ensure_compiled/1 must be used in rare cases, usually involving macros that need to invoke a module for callback information.

Examples

iex> Code.ensure_loaded(Atom)
{:module, Atom}

iex> Code.ensure_loaded(DoesNotExist)
{:error, :nofile}
Link to this function

ensure_loaded?(module) View Source
ensure_loaded?(module()) :: boolean()

Ensures the given module is loaded.

Similar to ensure_loaded/1, but returns true if the module is already loaded or was successfully loaded. Returns false otherwise.

Examples

iex> Code.ensure_loaded?(Atom)
true
Link to this function

eval_file(file, relative_to \\ nil) View Source
eval_file(binary(), nil | binary()) :: {term(), binding :: list()}

Evals the given file.

Accepts relative_to as an argument to tell where the file is located.

While require_file/2 and compile_file/2 return the loaded modules and their bytecode, eval_file/2 simply evaluates the file contents and returns the evaluation result and its bindings (exactly the same return value as eval_string/3).

Link to this function

eval_quoted(quoted, binding \\ [], opts \\ []) View Source
eval_quoted(Macro.t(), list(), Macro.Env.t() | keyword()) ::
  {term(), binding :: list()}

Evaluates the quoted contents.

Warning: Calling this function inside a macro is considered bad practice as it will attempt to evaluate runtime values at compile time. Macro arguments are typically transformed by unquoting them into the returned quoted expressions (instead of evaluated).

See eval_string/3 for a description of bindings and options.

Examples

iex> contents = quote(do: var!(a) + var!(b))
iex> Code.eval_quoted(contents, [a: 1, b: 2], file: __ENV__.file, line: __ENV__.line)
{3, [a: 1, b: 2]}

For convenience, you can pass __ENV__/0 as the opts argument and all options will be automatically extracted from the current environment:

iex> contents = quote(do: var!(a) + var!(b))
iex> Code.eval_quoted(contents, [a: 1, b: 2], __ENV__)
{3, [a: 1, b: 2]}
Link to this function

eval_string(string, binding \\ [], opts \\ []) View Source
eval_string(List.Chars.t(), list(), Macro.Env.t() | keyword()) ::
  {term(), binding :: list()}

Evaluates the contents given by string.

The binding argument is a keyword list of variable bindings. The opts argument is a keyword list of environment options.

Warning: string can be any Elixir code and will be executed with the same privileges as the Erlang VM: this means that such code could compromise the machine (for example by executing system commands). Don't use eval_string/3 with untrusted input (such as strings coming from the network).

Options

Options can be:

  • :file - the file to be considered in the evaluation

  • :line - the line on which the script starts

Additionally, the following scope values can be configured:

  • :aliases - a list of tuples with the alias and its target

  • :requires - a list of modules required

  • :functions - a list of tuples where the first element is a module and the second a list of imported function names and arity; the list of function names and arity must be sorted

  • :macros - a list of tuples where the first element is a module and the second a list of imported macro names and arity; the list of function names and arity must be sorted

Notice that setting any of the values above overrides Elixir's default values. For example, setting :requires to [] will no longer automatically require the Kernel module. In the same way setting :macros will no longer auto-import Kernel macros like Kernel.if/2, Kernel.SpecialForms.case/2, and so on.

Returns a tuple of the form {value, binding}, where value is the value returned from evaluating string. If an error occurs while evaluating string an exception will be raised.

binding is a keyword list with the value of all variable bindings after evaluating string. The binding key is usually an atom, but it may be a tuple for variables defined in a different context.

Examples

iex> Code.eval_string("a + b", [a: 1, b: 2], file: __ENV__.file, line: __ENV__.line)
{3, [a: 1, b: 2]}

iex> Code.eval_string("c = a + b", [a: 1, b: 2], __ENV__)
{3, [a: 1, b: 2, c: 3]}

iex> Code.eval_string("a = a + b", [a: 1, b: 2])
{3, [a: 3, b: 2]}

For convenience, you can pass __ENV__/0 as the opts argument and all imports, requires and aliases defined in the current environment will be automatically carried over:

iex> Code.eval_string("a + b", [a: 1, b: 2], __ENV__)
{3, [a: 1, b: 2]}
Link to this function

fetch_docs(module_or_path) View Source (since 1.7.0)
fetch_docs(module() | String.t()) ::
  {:docs_v1, annotation, beam_language, format, module_doc :: doc_content,
   metadata, docs :: [doc_element]}
  | {:error, :module_not_found | :chunk_not_found | {:invalid_chunk, binary()}}
when annotation: :erl_anno.anno(),
     beam_language: :elixir | :erlang | :lfe | :alpaca | atom(),
     doc_content: %{optional(binary()) => binary()} | :none | :hidden,
     doc_element:
       {{kind :: atom(), function_name :: atom(), arity()}, annotation,
        signature, doc_content, metadata},
     format: binary(),
     signature: [binary()],
     metadata: map()

Returns the docs for the given module or path to .beam file.

When given a module name, it finds its BEAM code and reads the docs from it.

When given a path to a .beam file, it will load the docs directly from that file.

It returns the term stored in the documentation chunk in the format defined by EEP 48 or {:error, reason} if the chunk is not available.

Examples

# Module documentation of an existing module
iex> {:docs_v1, _, :elixir, _, %{"en" => module_doc}, _, _} = Code.fetch_docs(Atom)
iex> module_doc |> String.split("\n") |> Enum.at(0)
"Convenience functions for working with atoms."

# A module that doesn't exist
iex> Code.fetch_docs(ModuleNotGood)
{:error, :module_not_found}
Link to this function

format_file!(file, opts \\ []) View Source (since 1.6.0)
format_file!(binary(), keyword()) :: iodata()

Formats a file.

See format_string!/2 for more information on code formatting and available options.

Link to this function

format_string!(string, opts \\ []) View Source (since 1.6.0)
format_string!(binary(), keyword()) :: iodata()

Formats the given code string.

The formatter receives a string representing Elixir code and returns iodata representing the formatted code according to pre-defined rules.

Options

  • :file - the file which contains the string, used for error reporting

  • :line - the line the string starts, used for error reporting

  • :line_length - the line length to aim for when formatting the document. Defaults to 98. Note this value is used as reference but it is not enforced by the formatter as sometimes user intervention is required. See "Running the formatter" section

  • :locals_without_parens - a keyword list of name and arity pairs that should be kept without parens whenever possible. The arity may be the atom :*, which implies all arities of that name. The formatter already includes a list of functions and this option augments this list.

  • :rename_deprecated_at - rename all known deprecated functions at the given version to their non-deprecated equivalent. It expects a valid Version which is usually the minimum Elixir version supported by the project.

Design principles

The formatter was designed under three principles.

First, the formatter never changes the semantics of the code by default. This means the input AST and the output AST are equivalent. Optional behaviour, such as :rename_deprecated_at, is allowed to break this guarantee.

The second principle is to provide as little configuration as possible. This eases the formatter adoption by removing contention points while making sure a single style is followed consistently by the community as a whole.

The formatter does not hard code names. The formatter will not behave specially because a function is named defmodule, def, etc. This principle mirrors Elixir's goal of being an extensible language where developers can extend the language with new constructs as if they were part of the language. When it is absolutely necessary to change behaviour based on the name, this behaviour should be configurable, such as the :locals_without_parens option.

Running the formatter

The formatter attempts to fit the most it can on a single line and introduces line breaks wherever possible when it cannot.

In some cases, this may lead to undesired formatting. Therefore, some code generated by the formatter may not be aesthetically pleasing and may require explicit intervention from the developer. That's why we do not recommend to run the formatter blindly in an existing codebase. Instead you should format and sanity check each formatted file.

Let's see some examples. The code below:

"this is a very long string ... #{inspect(some_value)}"

may be formatted as:

"this is a very long string ... #{
  inspect(some_value)
}"

This happens because the only place the formatter can introduce a new line without changing the code semantics is in the interpolation. In those scenarios, we recommend developers to directly adjust the code. Here we can use the binary concatenation operator <>/2:

"this is a very long string " <>
  "... #{inspect(some_value)}"

The string concatenation makes the code fit on a single line and also gives more options to the formatter.

A similar example is when the formatter breaks a function definition over multiple clauses:

def my_function(
  %User{name: name, age: age, ...},
  arg1,
  arg2
) do
  ...
end

While the code above is completely valid, you may prefer to match on the struct variables inside the function body in order to keep the definition on a single line:

def my_function(%User{} = user, arg1, arg2) do
  %{name: name, age: age, ...} = user
  ...
end

In some situations, you can use the fact the formatter does not generate elegant code as a hint for refactoring. Take this code:

def board?(board_id, %User{} = user, available_permissions, required_permissions) do
  Tracker.OrganizationMembers.user_in_organization?(user.id, board.organization_id) and
    required_permissions == Enum.to_list(MapSet.intersection(MapSet.new(required_permissions), MapSet.new(available_permissions)))
end

The code above has very long lines and running the formatter is not going to address this issue. In fact, the formatter may make it more obvious that you have complex expressions:

def board?(board_id, %User{} = user, available_permissions, required_permissions) do
  Tracker.OrganizationMembers.user_in_organization?(user.id, board.organization_id) and
    required_permissions ==
      Enum.to_list(
        MapSet.intersection(
          MapSet.new(required_permissions),
          MapSet.new(available_permissions)
        )
      )
end

Take such cases as a suggestion that your code should be refactored:

def board?(board_id, %User{} = user, available_permissions, required_permissions) do
  Tracker.OrganizationMembers.user_in_organization?(user.id, board.organization_id) and
    matching_permissions?(required_permissions, available_permissions)
end

defp matching_permissions?(required_permissions, available_permissions) do
  intersection =
    required_permissions
    |> MapSet.new()
    |> MapSet.intersection(MapSet.new(available_permissions))
    |> Enum.to_list()

  required_permissions == intersection
end

To sum it up: since the formatter cannot change the semantics of your code, sometimes it is necessary to tweak or refactor the code to get optimal formatting. To help better understand how to control the formatter, we describe in the next sections the cases where the formatter keeps the user encoding and how to control multiline expressions.

Keeping user's formatting

The formatter respects the input format in some cases. Those are listed below:

  • Insignificant digits in numbers are kept as is. The formatter however always inserts underscores for decimal numbers with more than 5 digits and converts hexadecimal digits to uppercase

  • Strings, charlists, atoms and sigils are kept as is. No character is automatically escaped or unescaped. The choice of delimiter is also respected from the input

  • Newlines inside blocks are kept as in the input except for: 1) expressions that take multiple lines will always have an empty line before and after and 2) empty lines are always squeezed together into a single empty line

  • The choice between :do keyword and do/end blocks is left to the user

  • Lists, tuples, bitstrings, maps, structs and function calls will be broken into multiple lines if they are followed by a newline in the opening bracket and preceded by a new line in the closing bracket

  • Pipeline operators, like |> and others with the same precedence, will span multiple lines if they spanned multiple lines in the input

The behaviours above are not guaranteed. We may remove or add new rules in the future. The goal of documenting them is to provide better understanding on what to expect from the formatter.

Multi-line lists, maps, tuples, etc.

You can force lists, tuples, bitstrings, maps, structs and function calls to have one entry per line by adding a newline after the opening bracket and a new line before the closing bracket lines. For example:

[
  foo,
  bar
]

If there are no newlines around the brackets, then the formatter will try to fit everything on a single line, such that the snippet below

[foo,
 bar]

will be formatted as

[foo, bar]

You can also force function calls and keywords to be rendered on multiple lines by having each entry on its own line:

defstruct name: nil,
          age: 0

The code above will be kept with one keyword entry per line by the formatter. To avoid that, just squash everything into a single line.

Parens and no parens in function calls

Elixir has two syntaxes for function calls. With parens and no parens. By default, Elixir will add parens to all calls except for:

  1. calls that have do/end blocks
  2. local calls without parens where the name and arity of the local call is also listed under :locals_without_parens (except for calls with arity 0, where the compiler always require parens)

The choice of parens and no parens also affects indentation. When a function call with parens doesn't fit on the same line, the formatter introduces a newline around parens and indents the arguments with two spaces:

some_call(
  arg1,
  arg2,
  arg3
)

On the other hand, function calls without parens are always indented by the function call length itself, like this:

some_call arg1,
          arg2,
          arg3

If the last argument is a data structure, such as maps and lists, and the beginning of the data structure fits on the same line as the function call, then no indentation happens, this allows code like this:

Enum.reduce(some_collection, initial_value, fn element, acc ->
  # code
end)

some_function_without_parens %{
  foo: :bar,
  baz: :bat
}

Code comments

The formatter also handles code comments in a way to guarantee a space is always added between the beginning of the comment (#) and the next character.

The formatter also extracts all trailing comments to their previous line. For example, the code below

hello #world

will be rewritten to

# world
hello

Because code comments are handled apart from the code representation (AST), there are some situations where code comments are seen as ambiguous by the code formatter. For example, the comment in the anonymous function below

fn
  arg1 ->
    body1
    # comment

  arg2 ->
    body2
end

and in this one

fn
  arg1 ->
    body1

  # comment
  arg2 ->
    body2
end

are considered equivalent (the nesting is discarded alongside most of user formatting). In such cases, the code formatter will always format to the latter.

Link to this function

get_docs(module, kind) View Source
get_docs(module(), :moduledoc | :docs | :callback_docs | :type_docs | :all) ::
  nil

This function is deprecated. Code.get_docs/2 always returns nil as its outdated documentation is no longer stored on BEAM files. Use Code.fetch_docs/1 instead.

Deprecated function to retrieve old documentation format.

Elixir v1.7 adopts EEP 48 which is a new documentation format meant to be shared across all BEAM languages. The old format, used by Code.get_docs/2, is no longer available, and therefore this function always returns nil. Use Code.fetch_docs/1 instead.

Link to this function

prepend_path(path) View Source
prepend_path(Path.t()) :: true | {:error, :bad_directory}

Prepends a path to the beginning of the Erlang VM code path list.

This is the list of directories the Erlang VM uses for finding module code.

The path is expanded with Path.expand/1 before being prepended. If this path does not exist, an error is returned.

Examples

Code.prepend_path(".")
#=> true

Code.prepend_path("/does_not_exist")
#=> {:error, :bad_directory}
Link to this function

purge_compiler_modules() View Source (since 1.7.0)
purge_compiler_modules() :: {:ok, non_neg_integer()}

Purge compiler modules.

The compiler utilizes temporary modules to compile code. For example, elixir_compiler_1, elixir_compiler_2, etc. In case the compiled code stores references to anonymous functions or similar, the Elixir compiler may be unable to reclaim those modules, keeping an unnecessary amount of code in memory and eventually leading to modules such as elixir_compiler_12345.

This function purges all modules currently kept by the compiler, allowing old compiler module names to be reused. If there are any processes running any code from such modules, they will be terminated too.

It returns {:ok, number_of_modules_purged}.

Link to this function

require_file(file, relative_to \\ nil) View Source
require_file(binary(), nil | binary()) :: [{module(), binary()}] | nil

Requires the given file.

Accepts relative_to as an argument to tell where the file is located. If the file was already required, require_file/2 doesn't do anything and returns nil.

Notice that if require_file/2 is invoked by different processes concurrently, the first process to invoke require_file/2 acquires a lock and the remaining ones will block until the file is available. This means that if require_file/2 is called more than once with a given file, that file will be compiled only once. The first process to call require_file/2 will get the list of loaded modules, others will get nil.

See compile_file/2 if you would like to compile a file without tracking its filenames. Finally, if you would like to get the result of evaluating a file rather than the modules defined in it, see eval_file/2.

Examples

If the file has not been required, it returns the list of modules:

modules = Code.require_file("eex_test.exs", "../eex/test")
List.first(modules)
#=> {EExTest.Compiled, <<70, 79, 82, 49, ...>>}

If the file has been required, it returns nil:

Code.require_file("eex_test.exs", "../eex/test")
#=> nil
Link to this function

required_files() View Source (since 1.7.0)
required_files() :: [binary()]

Lists all required files.

Examples

Code.require_file("../eex/test/eex_test.exs")
List.first(Code.required_files()) =~ "eex_test.exs"
#=> true
Link to this function

string_to_quoted(string, opts \\ []) View Source
string_to_quoted(List.Chars.t(), keyword()) ::
  {:ok, Macro.t()} | {:error, {line :: pos_integer(), term(), term()}}

Converts the given string to its quoted form.

Returns {:ok, quoted_form} if it succeeds, {:error, {line, error, token}} otherwise.

Options

  • :file - the filename to be reported in case of parsing errors. Defaults to "nofile".

  • :line - the starting line of the string being parsed. Defaults to 1.

  • :columns - when true, attach a :column key to the quoted metadata. Defaults to false.

  • :existing_atoms_only - when true, raises an error when non-existing atoms are found by the tokenizer. Defaults to false.

  • :warn_on_unnecessary_quotes - when false, does not warn when atoms, keywords or calls have unnecessary quotes on them. Defaults to true.

Macro.to_string/2

The opposite of converting a string to its quoted form is Macro.to_string/2, which converts a quoted form to a string/binary representation.

Link to this function

string_to_quoted!(string, opts \\ []) View Source
string_to_quoted!(List.Chars.t(), keyword()) :: Macro.t()

Converts the given string to its quoted form.

It returns the ast if it succeeds, raises an exception otherwise. The exception is a TokenMissingError in case a token is missing (usually because the expression is incomplete), SyntaxError otherwise.

Check string_to_quoted/2 for options information.

Link to this function

unrequire_files(files) View Source (since 1.7.0)
unrequire_files([binary()]) :: :ok

Removes files from the required files list.

The modules defined in the file are not removed; calling this function only removes them from the list, allowing them to be required again.

Examples

# Require EEx test code
Code.require_file("../eex/test/eex_test.exs")

# Now unrequire all files
Code.unrequire_files(Code.required_files())

# Notice modules are still available
function_exported?(EExTest.Compiled, :before_compile, 0)
#=> true