Enux (enux v0.9.3) View Source

A package for reading variables from env style and json configuration files and injecting them into your application.

Installation

def deps do
  [
    {:enux, "~> 0.9.3"},

    # if you want to load json files, you should have either this
    {:jason, "~> 1.2"},
    # or this
    {:poison, "~> 5.0"}
  ]
end

Usage

In elixir 1.11, config/runtime.exs was introduced. This is a file that is executed exactly before your application starts. This is a proper place to load any configuration variables into your app. If this file does not exist in your project directory, create it and add these lines to it:

import Config
env = Enux.load()
config :otp_app, env

When you start your application, you can access your configuration variables using Applicatoin.get_env. If you need to url encode your configuration values, just pass url_encoded: true to Enux.load.

You should have either poison or jason in your dependencies if you want to use json files.

You can load multiple files of different kinds:

import Config

env1 = Enux.load("config/one.env", url_encoded: true)
config :otp_app, env1

env2 = Enux.load("config/two.json")
config :otp_app, :two, env2

Another way of using Enux is using the Enux.autoload function which will load all .env and .json files in your config directory. it makes more sense to call this function in your config/runtime.exs but you can call it anywhere in your code.

If you have config/pg.env and config/redis.json in your project directory, after calling Enux.autoload(:otp_app), you can access the variables using Application.get_env(:otp_app, :pg) and Application.get_env(:otp_app, :redis). if a file is named .env or .json, you should use Application.get_env(:otp_app, :env) or Application.get_env(:otp_app, :json) respectively.

Enux.autoload(:otp_app)

You may also use Enux.expect to both validate and document your required environment. first you need to define a schema:

schema = [
  id: [&is_integer/1, fn id -> id > 1000 end],
  username: [&is_binary/1, fn u -> String.length(u) > 8 end],
  metadata: [],
  profile: [
    full_name: [&is_binary/1],
    age: [&is_number/1]
  ]
]

then the following line will check for compliance of your environment under :otp_app and :key with the schema defined above (an empty list implies only checking for existence):

Enux.expect(:otp_app, :key, schema)

Link to this section Summary

Functions

automatically loads all .env and .json files in your config directory. pass your project's name as an atom. you can also still pass url_encoded: true to it.

checks if the environment variables under app and key comply with the given schema. any non-compliance results in an error. you can use this function for both validating and documenting your required environment.

reads the variables in config/.env and returns a formatted keyword list. all values are loaded as they are.

reads the variables in config/.env and returns a formatted keyword list

reads the variables in the given path(could be .env or .json file) and returns a formatted keyword list

Link to this section Functions

Link to this function

autoload(app, opts \\ [])

View Source

automatically loads all .env and .json files in your config directory. pass your project's name as an atom. you can also still pass url_encoded: true to it.

Link to this function

expect(app, key, schema)

View Source

checks if the environment variables under app and key comply with the given schema. any non-compliance results in an error. you can use this function for both validating and documenting your required environment.

reads the variables in config/.env and returns a formatted keyword list. all values are loaded as they are.

reads the variables in config/.env and returns a formatted keyword list

reads the variables in the given path(could be .env or .json file) and returns a formatted keyword list