Phoenix.HTML v2.10.2 Phoenix.HTML View Source

Helpers for working with HTML strings and templates.

When used, it imports the given modules:

HTML Safe

One of the main responsibilities of this module is to provide convenience functions for escaping and marking HTML code as safe.

By default, data output in templates is not considered safe:

<%= "<hello>" %>

will be shown as:

&lt;hello&gt;

User data or data coming from the database is almost never considered safe. However, in some cases, you may want to tag it as safe and show its “raw” contents:

<%= raw "<hello>" %>

Keep in mind most helpers will automatically escape your data and return safe content:

<%= content_tag :p, "<hello>" %>

will properly output:

<p>&lt;hello&gt;</p>

Link to this section Summary

Types

Guaranteed to be safe

May be safe or unsafe (i.e. it needs to be converted)

Functions

Escapes quotes (double and single), double backslashes and other

Escapes the HTML entities in the given term, returning iodata

Marks the given content as raw

Converts a safe result into a string

Provides ~E sigil with HTML safe EEx syntax inside source files

Provides ~e sigil with HTML safe EEx syntax inside source files

Link to this section Types

Link to this type safe() View Source
safe() :: {:safe, iodata}

Guaranteed to be safe

May be safe or unsafe (i.e. it needs to be converted)

Link to this section Functions

Link to this function escape_javascript(data) View Source
escape_javascript(binary | safe) :: String.t

Escapes quotes (double and single), double backslashes and other.

This function is useful in JavaScript responses when there is a need to escape html rendered from other templates, like in the following:

$("#container").append("<%= escape_javascript(render("post.html", post: @post)) %>");
Link to this function html_escape(safe) View Source
html_escape(unsafe) :: safe

Escapes the HTML entities in the given term, returning iodata.

iex> html_escape("<hello>")
{:safe, "&lt;hello&gt;"}

iex> html_escape('<hello>')
{:safe, ["&lt;", 104, 101, 108, 108, 111, "&gt;"]}

iex> html_escape(1)
{:safe, "1"}

iex> html_escape({:safe, "<hello>"})
{:safe, "<hello>"}

Marks the given content as raw.

This means any HTML code inside the given string won’t be escaped.

iex> raw("<hello>")
{:safe, "<hello>"}
iex> raw({:safe, "<hello>"})
{:safe, "<hello>"}
iex> raw(nil)
{:safe, ""}
Link to this function safe_to_string(arg) View Source
safe_to_string(safe) :: String.t

Converts a safe result into a string.

Fails if the result is not safe. In such cases, you can invoke html_escape/1 or raw/1 accordingly before.

Link to this macro sigil_E(expr, opts) View Source (macro)

Provides ~E sigil with HTML safe EEx syntax inside source files.

Does not raise on attempts to interpolate with #{}, but rather shows those characters literally, so it should be preferred over ~e.

iex> ~E"""
...> Hello <%= "world" %>
...> """
{:safe, [[["" | "Hello "] | "world"] | "\n"]}
Link to this macro sigil_e(expr, opts) View Source (macro)

Provides ~e sigil with HTML safe EEx syntax inside source files.

Raises on attempts to interpolate with #{}, so ~E should be preferred.

iex> ~e"""
...> Hello <%= "world" %>
...> """
{:safe, [[["" | "Hello "] | "world"] | "\n"]}