snowhite v1.1.2 Snowhite.Helpers.Timing View Source

Helper module to write milliseconds in a readable way. The goal of this module is help you quickly remember what milliseconds time you set instead of having to decode it yourself. Let's be honest, it's easier to understand 1h 30m and 10seconds than 5410000m than 5410000ms.

It basically parses a syntax similar to 1h30m10s to a clock format ({1, 30, 10}). Then it can easily convert such clock to milliseconds. To quickly get ms out of a time string, you can use the sigil ~d() (for duration) to help you.

Link to this section Summary

Functions

Converts a given unit of time to milliseconds

Converts a clock tuple to milliseconds.

Same as parse!/1 but returns an ok tuple or an error tuple

Parses a clock string to a clock tuple. Raises if the format doesn't match. It supports any combination in any order of xh, xm and xs.

Most of the time you will rely on the sigil as it makes it easier to declare both compile time and runtime milliseconds.

Returns a zero clock {0, 0, 0}

Link to this section Types

Specs

clock() :: {integer(), integer(), integer()}

Specs

milliseconds() :: integer()

Specs

time_unit() :: :hours | :minutes | :seconds

Link to this section Functions

Specs

as_ms(integer(), time_unit()) :: milliseconds()

Converts a given unit of time to milliseconds

Examples

iex> alias Snowhite.Helpers.Timing
iex> Timing.as_ms(10, :hours)
36000000
iex> Timing.as_ms(10, :minutes)
600000
iex> Timing.as_ms(10, :seconds)
10000

Specs

clock_to_ms(clock()) :: milliseconds()

Converts a clock tuple to milliseconds.

Examples

iex> alias Snowhite.Helpers.Timing
iex> Timing.clock_to_ms({10, 3, 20})
36200000
iex> Timing.clock_to_ms({0, 0, 1})
1000

Specs

parse(String.t()) :: {:error, :invalid_format} | {:ok, clock()}

Same as parse!/1 but returns an ok tuple or an error tuple

Examples

iex> alias Snowhite.Helpers.Timing
iex> Timing.parse!("1h20m")
{:ok, {1, 20, 0}{}
iex> Timing.parse!("1x")
{:error, :invalid_format}

Specs

parse!(String.t()) :: clock()

Parses a clock string to a clock tuple. Raises if the format doesn't match. It supports any combination in any order of xh, xm and xs.

Examples

iex> alias Snowhite.Helpers.Timing
iex> Timing.parse!("1h20m")
{1, 20, 0}
iex> Timing.parse!("1x")
ArgumentError "Expected clock format, received `1x`"

Specs

sigil_d(String.t(), list()) :: milliseconds()

Most of the time you will rely on the sigil as it makes it easier to declare both compile time and runtime milliseconds.

Exmaples

iex> import Snowhite.Helpers.Timing
iex> ~d(1h30m10s)
5410000
iex> ~d(1h)
3600000
iex> ~d(1h30m)
5400000
iex> ~d(15m10s)
910000
iex> ~d(1s)
1000

Specs

zero() :: clock()

Returns a zero clock {0, 0, 0}