AuthPlug.Token (auth_plug v1.4.9)

Token module to create and validate jwt. see https://hexdocs.pm/joken/configuration.html#module-approach

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Functions

api_key/0 retrieves the API_KEY from environment variable. API keys are a single environment variable which is comprised of two parts. client_id/client_secret such that splitting on the "/" (forward slash) gives us the client_id and client_secret example: 2cfxNaWUwJBq1F4nPndoEHZJ5YCCNq9JDNAAR/2cfxNadrhMZk3iaT1L5k6Wt67c9ScbGNPz8Bw/dwylauth.herokuapp.com see: https://github.com/dwyl/auth/issues/42#issuecomment-620247243

auth_url/0 returns the auth_url (the last part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

client_id/0 returns the client_id (the first part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

client_secret/0 returns the client_secret (the middle part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

create_jwt_session/2 recieves a conn (Plug.Conn) and claims e.g: %{email: "person@dwyl.com", id: 1}. Signs a JWT which gets attached to the session. This is super-useful in testing as we can simply invoke create_jwt_session(conn, %{email: "al@ex.co", id: 1}) and continue the request pipeline with a valid session.

create_session/2 takes a conn, claims and a JWT and creates the session using Phoenix Sessions and the JWT as the value so that it can be checked on each future request. Makes the decoded JWT available in conn.assigns.person which means it can be used in templates.

create_signer/1 creates a signer for the given secret key. It uses the HS256 (HMAC with SHA-256) to generate the signature. if you're wondering what "HS256" is, read: community.auth0.com/t/jwt-signing-algorithms-rs256-vs-hs256/7720

Combines generate_claims/1 and encode_and_sign/2

generate_jwt!/1 invokes Joken.generate_and_sign/3 claims are the data to be signed. Throws an error if anyting in the claims is invalid.

generate_jwt!/2 invokes Joken.generate_and_sign/3 claims are the data to be signed and secret is the secret key.

get_jwt/1 extracts the JWT from HTTP Request headers, URL or Cookie. If no JWT is found, it returns nil.

put_current_token/3 takes a conn, JWT and values (decoded JWT) and creates the session using create_session/2 defined above.

verify_jwt/1 verifies the given JWT and returns {:ok, claims} where the claims are the original data that were signed.

verify_jwt/2 verifies the given JWT and secret. Returns {:ok, claims} where the claims are the original data that were signed.

verify_jwt!/1 verifies the given JWT and returns claims where the claims are the original data that were signed.

verify_jwt!/2 verifies the given JWT and returns claims where the token is the JWT that was signed secret is the secret key. Returns claims the original claims contained in the JWT.

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api_key/0 retrieves the API_KEY from environment variable. API keys are a single environment variable which is comprised of two parts. client_id/client_secret such that splitting on the "/" (forward slash) gives us the client_id and client_secret example: 2cfxNaWUwJBq1F4nPndoEHZJ5YCCNq9JDNAAR/2cfxNadrhMZk3iaT1L5k6Wt67c9ScbGNPz8Bw/dwylauth.herokuapp.com see: https://github.com/dwyl/auth/issues/42#issuecomment-620247243

auth_url/0 returns the auth_url (the last part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

client_id/0 returns the client_id (the first part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

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client_secret()

client_secret/0 returns the client_secret (the middle part of the AUTH_API_KEY)

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create_jwt_session(conn, claims)

create_jwt_session/2 recieves a conn (Plug.Conn) and claims e.g: %{email: "person@dwyl.com", id: 1}. Signs a JWT which gets attached to the session. This is super-useful in testing as we can simply invoke create_jwt_session(conn, %{email: "al@ex.co", id: 1}) and continue the request pipeline with a valid session.

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create_session(conn, claims, jwt)

create_session/2 takes a conn, claims and a JWT and creates the session using Phoenix Sessions and the JWT as the value so that it can be checked on each future request. Makes the decoded JWT available in conn.assigns.person which means it can be used in templates.

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create_signer(secret)

create_signer/1 creates a signer for the given secret key. It uses the HS256 (HMAC with SHA-256) to generate the signature. if you're wondering what "HS256" is, read: community.auth0.com/t/jwt-signing-algorithms-rs256-vs-hs256/7720

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generate_and_sign(extra_claims \\ %{}, key \\ __default_signer__())

Specs

generate_and_sign(Joken.claims(), Joken.signer_arg()) ::
  {:ok, Joken.bearer_token(), Joken.claims()} | {:error, Joken.error_reason()}

Combines generate_claims/1 and encode_and_sign/2

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generate_and_sign!(extra_claims \\ %{}, key \\ __default_signer__())

Specs

generate_and_sign!(Joken.claims(), Joken.signer_arg()) :: Joken.bearer_token()

Same as generate_and_sign/2 but raises if error

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generate_jwt!(claims)

generate_jwt!/1 invokes Joken.generate_and_sign/3 claims are the data to be signed. Throws an error if anyting in the claims is invalid.

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generate_jwt!(claims, secret)

generate_jwt!/2 invokes Joken.generate_and_sign/3 claims are the data to be signed and secret is the secret key.

get_jwt/1 extracts the JWT from HTTP Request headers, URL or Cookie. If no JWT is found, it returns nil.

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put_current_token(conn, jwt, values)

put_current_token/3 takes a conn, JWT and values (decoded JWT) and creates the session using create_session/2 defined above.

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verify_and_validate(bearer_token, key \\ __default_signer__(), context \\ %{})

Specs

verify_and_validate(Joken.bearer_token(), Joken.signer_arg(), term()) ::
  {:ok, Joken.claims()} | {:error, Joken.error_reason()}

Combines verify/2 and validate/2

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verify_and_validate!(bearer_token, key \\ __default_signer__(), context \\ %{})

Specs

verify_and_validate!(Joken.bearer_token(), Joken.signer_arg(), term()) ::
  Joken.claims()

Same as verify_and_validate/2 but raises if error

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verify_jwt(token)

verify_jwt/1 verifies the given JWT and returns {:ok, claims} where the claims are the original data that were signed.

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verify_jwt(token, secret)

verify_jwt/2 verifies the given JWT and secret. Returns {:ok, claims} where the claims are the original data that were signed.

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verify_jwt!(token)

verify_jwt!/1 verifies the given JWT and returns claims where the claims are the original data that were signed.

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verify_jwt!(token, secret)

verify_jwt!/2 verifies the given JWT and returns claims where the token is the JWT that was signed secret is the secret key. Returns claims the original claims contained in the JWT.