Elixir v1.8.2 DateTime View Source

A datetime implementation with a time zone.

This datetime can be seen as an ephemeral snapshot of a datetime at a given time zone. For such purposes, it also includes both UTC and Standard offsets, as well as the zone abbreviation field used exclusively for formatting purposes.

Remember, comparisons in Elixir using ==/2, >/2, </2 and friends are structural and based on the DateTime struct fields. For proper comparison between datetimes, use the compare/2 function.

Developers should avoid creating the DateTime struct directly and instead rely on the functions provided by this module as well as the ones in third-party calendar libraries.

Time zone database

Many functions in this module require a time zone database. By default, it uses the default time zone database returned by Calendar.get_time_zone_database/0, which defaults to Calendar.UTCOnlyTimeZoneDatabase which only handles "Etc/UTC" datetimes and returns {:error, :utc_only_time_zone_database} for any other time zone.

Other time zone databases (including ones provided by packages) can be configure as default either via configuration:

config :elixir, :time_zone_database, CustomTimeZoneDatabase

or by calling Calendar.put_time_zone_database/1.

Link to this section Summary

Functions

Compares two datetime structs.

Converts a given datetime from one calendar to another.

Converts a given datetime from one calendar to another.

Subtracts datetime2 from datetime1.

Parses the extended "Date and time of day" format described by ISO 8601:2004.

Returns the current datetime in the provided time zone.

Converts a DateTime into a Date.

Converts the given datetime to ISO 8601:2004 format.

Converts the given datetime into a NaiveDateTime.

Converts the given datetime to a string according to its calendar.

Converts a DateTime into Time.

Converts the given datetime to Unix time.

Returns the given datetime with the microsecond field truncated to the given precision (:microsecond, millisecond or :second).

Returns the current datetime in UTC.

Link to this section Types

Link to this type

t() View Source
t() :: %DateTime{
  calendar: Calendar.calendar(),
  day: Calendar.day(),
  hour: Calendar.hour(),
  microsecond: Calendar.microsecond(),
  minute: Calendar.minute(),
  month: Calendar.month(),
  second: Calendar.second(),
  std_offset: Calendar.std_offset(),
  time_zone: Calendar.time_zone(),
  utc_offset: Calendar.utc_offset(),
  year: Calendar.year(),
  zone_abbr: Calendar.zone_abbr()
}

Link to this section Functions

Link to this function

add(datetime, amount_to_add, unit \\ :second, time_zone_database \\ Calendar.get_time_zone_database()) View Source (since 1.8.0)

Adds a specified amount of time to a DateTime.

Accepts an amount_to_add in any unit available from System.time_unit/0. Negative values will move backwards in time.

Takes changes such as summer time/DST into account. This means that adding time can cause the wall time to "go backwards" during "fall back" during autumn. Adding just a few seconds to a datetime just before "spring forward" can cause wall time to increase by more than an hour.

Fractional second precision stays the same in a similar way to NaiveDateTime.add/2.

Examples

iex> dt = DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2018-11-15 10:00:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> dt |> DateTime.add(3600, :second, FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
#DateTime<2018-11-15 11:00:00+01:00 CET Europe/Copenhagen>

iex> dt = DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2018-11-15 10:00:00], "Etc/UTC")
iex> dt |> DateTime.add(3600, :second)
#DateTime<2018-11-15 11:00:00Z>

When adding 3 seconds just before "spring forward" we go from 1:59:59 to 3:00:02

iex> dt = DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2019-03-31 01:59:59.123], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> dt |> DateTime.add(3, :second, FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
#DateTime<2019-03-31 03:00:02.123+02:00 CEST Europe/Copenhagen>
Link to this function

compare(datetime1, datetime2) View Source (since 1.4.0)
compare(Calendar.datetime(), Calendar.datetime()) :: :lt | :eq | :gt

Compares two datetime structs.

Returns :gt if the first datetime is later than the second and :lt for vice versa. If the two datetimes are equal :eq is returned.

Note that both UTC and Standard offsets will be taken into account when comparison is done.

Examples

iex> dt1 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> dt2 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.compare(dt1, dt2)
:gt
Link to this function

convert(datetime, calendar) View Source (since 1.5.0)
convert(Calendar.datetime(), Calendar.calendar()) ::
  {:ok, t()} | {:error, :incompatible_calendars}

Converts a given datetime from one calendar to another.

If it is not possible to convert unambiguously between the calendars (see Calendar.compatible_calendars?/2), an {:error, :incompatible_calendars} tuple is returned.

Examples

Imagine someone implements Calendar.Holocene, a calendar based on the Gregorian calendar that adds exactly 10,000 years to the current Gregorian year:

iex> dt1 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> DateTime.convert(dt1, Calendar.Holocene)
{:ok, %DateTime{calendar: Calendar.Holocene, day: 29, hour: 23,
                microsecond: {0, 0}, minute: 0, month: 2, second: 7, std_offset: 0,
                time_zone: "America/Manaus", utc_offset: -14400, year: 12000,
                zone_abbr: "AMT"}}
Link to this function

convert!(datetime, calendar) View Source (since 1.5.0)
convert!(Calendar.datetime(), Calendar.calendar()) :: t()

Converts a given datetime from one calendar to another.

If it is not possible to convert unambiguously between the calendars (see Calendar.compatible_calendars?/2), an ArgumentError is raised.

Examples

Imagine someone implements Calendar.Holocene, a calendar based on the Gregorian calendar that adds exactly 10,000 years to the current Gregorian year:

iex> dt1 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> DateTime.convert!(dt1, Calendar.Holocene)
%DateTime{calendar: Calendar.Holocene, day: 29, hour: 23,
          microsecond: {0, 0}, minute: 0, month: 2, second: 7, std_offset: 0,
          time_zone: "America/Manaus", utc_offset: -14400, year: 12000,
          zone_abbr: "AMT"}
Link to this function

diff(datetime1, datetime2, unit \\ :second) View Source (since 1.5.0)

Subtracts datetime2 from datetime1.

The answer can be returned in any unit available from System.time_unit/0.

Leap seconds are not taken into account.

This function returns the difference in seconds where seconds are measured according to Calendar.ISO.

Examples

iex> dt1 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> dt2 = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                 hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                 utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.diff(dt1, dt2)
18000
iex> DateTime.diff(dt2, dt1)
-18000
Link to this function

from_iso8601(string, calendar \\ Calendar.ISO) View Source (since 1.4.0)
from_iso8601(String.t(), Calendar.calendar()) ::
  {:ok, t(), Calendar.utc_offset()} | {:error, atom()}

Parses the extended "Date and time of day" format described by ISO 8601:2004.

Since ISO 8601 does not include the proper time zone, the given string will be converted to UTC and its offset in seconds will be returned as part of this function. Therefore offset information must be present in the string.

As specified in the standard, the separator "T" may be omitted if desired as there is no ambiguity within this function.

The year parsed by this function is limited to four digits and, while ISO 8601 allows datetimes to specify 24:00:00 as the zero hour of the next day, this notation is not supported by Elixir. Note leap seconds are not supported by the built-in Calendar.ISO.

Examples

iex> {:ok, datetime, 0} = DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23T23:50:07Z")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2015-01-23 23:50:07Z>

iex> {:ok, datetime, 9000} = DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23T23:50:07.123+02:30")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2015-01-23 21:20:07.123Z>

iex> {:ok, datetime, 9000} = DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23T23:50:07,123+02:30")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2015-01-23 21:20:07.123Z>

iex> {:ok, datetime, 0} = DateTime.from_iso8601("-2015-01-23T23:50:07Z")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<-2015-01-23 23:50:07Z>

iex> {:ok, datetime, 9000} = DateTime.from_iso8601("-2015-01-23T23:50:07,123+02:30")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<-2015-01-23 21:20:07.123Z>

iex> DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23P23:50:07")
{:error, :invalid_format}
iex> DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23T23:50:07")
{:error, :missing_offset}
iex> DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23 23:50:61")
{:error, :invalid_time}
iex> DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-32 23:50:07")
{:error, :invalid_date}
iex> DateTime.from_iso8601("2015-01-23T23:50:07.123-00:00")
{:error, :invalid_format}
Link to this function

from_naive(naive_datetime, time_zone, time_zone_database \\ Calendar.get_time_zone_database()) View Source (since 1.4.0)
from_naive(
  Calendar.naive_datetime(),
  Calendar.time_zone(),
  Calendar.time_zone_database()
) ::
  {:ok, t()}
  | {:ambiguous, t(), t()}
  | {:gap, t(), t()}
  | {:error,
     :incompatible_calendars
     | :time_zone_not_found
     | :utc_only_time_zone_database}

Converts the given NaiveDateTime to DateTime.

It expects a time zone to put the NaiveDateTime in. If the time zone is "Etc/UTC", it always succeeds. Otherwise, the NaiveDateTime is checked against the time zone database given as time_zone_database. See the "Time zone database" section in the module documentation.

Examples

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.from_naive(~N[2016-05-24 13:26:08.003], "Etc/UTC")
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2016-05-24 13:26:08.003Z>

When the datetime is ambiguous - for instance during changing from summer to winter time - the two possible valid datetimes are returned. First the one that happens first, then the one that happens after.

iex> {:ambiguous, first_dt, second_dt} = DateTime.from_naive(~N[2018-10-28 02:30:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> first_dt
#DateTime<2018-10-28 02:30:00+02:00 CEST Europe/Copenhagen>
iex> second_dt
#DateTime<2018-10-28 02:30:00+01:00 CET Europe/Copenhagen>

When there is a gap in wall time - for instance in spring when the clocks are turned forward - the latest valid datetime just before the gap and the first valid datetime just after the gap.

iex> {:gap, just_before, just_after} = DateTime.from_naive(~N[2019-03-31 02:30:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> just_before
#DateTime<2019-03-31 01:59:59.999999+01:00 CET Europe/Copenhagen>
iex> just_after
#DateTime<2019-03-31 03:00:00+02:00 CEST Europe/Copenhagen>

Most of the time there is one, and just one, valid datetime for a certain date and time in a certain time zone.

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.from_naive(~N[2018-07-28 12:30:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2018-07-28 12:30:00+02:00 CEST Europe/Copenhagen>

This function accepts any map or struct that contains at least the same fields as a NaiveDateTime struct. The most common example of that is a DateTime. In this case the information about the time zone of that DateTime is completely ignored. This is the same principle as passing a DateTime to Date.to_iso8601/2. Date.to_iso8601/2 extracts only the date-specific fields (calendar, year, month and day) of the given structure and ignores all others.

This way if you have a DateTime in one time zone, you can get the same wall time in another time zone. For instance if you have 2018-08-24 10:00:00 in Copenhagen and want a DateTime for 2018-08-24 10:00:00 in UTC you can do:

iex> cph_datetime = DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2018-08-24 10:00:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> {:ok, utc_datetime} = DateTime.from_naive(cph_datetime, "Etc/UTC", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> utc_datetime
#DateTime<2018-08-24 10:00:00Z>

If instead you want a DateTime for the same point time in a different time zone see the DateTime.shift_zone/3 function which would convert 2018-08-24 10:00:00 in Copenhagen to 2018-08-24 08:00:00 in UTC.

Link to this function

from_naive!(naive_datetime, time_zone, time_zone_database \\ Calendar.get_time_zone_database()) View Source (since 1.4.0)

Converts the given NaiveDateTime to DateTime.

It expects a time zone to put the NaiveDateTime in. If the time zone is "Etc/UTC", it always succeeds. Otherwise, the NaiveDateTime is checked against the time zone database given as time_zone_database. See the "Time zone database" section in the module documentation.

Examples

iex> DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2016-05-24 13:26:08.003], "Etc/UTC")
#DateTime<2016-05-24 13:26:08.003Z>

iex> DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2018-05-24 13:26:08.003], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
#DateTime<2018-05-24 13:26:08.003+02:00 CEST Europe/Copenhagen>
Link to this function

from_unix(integer, unit \\ :second, calendar \\ Calendar.ISO) View Source
from_unix(integer(), :native | System.time_unit(), Calendar.calendar()) ::
  {:ok, t()} | {:error, atom()}

Converts the given Unix time to DateTime.

The integer can be given in different unit according to System.convert_time_unit/3 and it will be converted to microseconds internally.

Unix times are always in UTC and therefore the DateTime will be returned in UTC.

Examples

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.from_unix(1_464_096_368)
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2016-05-24 13:26:08Z>

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.from_unix(1_432_560_368_868_569, :microsecond)
iex> datetime
#DateTime<2015-05-25 13:26:08.868569Z>

The unit can also be an integer as in System.time_unit/0:

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.from_unix(143_256_036_886_856, 1024)
iex> datetime
#DateTime<6403-03-17 07:05:22.320Z>

Negative Unix times are supported, up to -62167219200 seconds, which is equivalent to "0000-01-01T00:00:00Z" or 0 Gregorian seconds.

Link to this function

from_unix!(integer, unit \\ :second, calendar \\ Calendar.ISO) View Source
from_unix!(integer(), :native | System.time_unit(), Calendar.calendar()) ::
  t()

Converts the given Unix time to DateTime.

The integer can be given in different unit according to System.convert_time_unit/3 and it will be converted to microseconds internally.

Unix times are always in UTC and therefore the DateTime will be returned in UTC.

Examples

# An easy way to get the Unix epoch is passing 0 to this function
iex> DateTime.from_unix!(0)
#DateTime<1970-01-01 00:00:00Z>

iex> DateTime.from_unix!(1_464_096_368)
#DateTime<2016-05-24 13:26:08Z>

iex> DateTime.from_unix!(1_432_560_368_868_569, :microsecond)
#DateTime<2015-05-25 13:26:08.868569Z>
Link to this function

now(time_zone, time_zone_database \\ Calendar.get_time_zone_database()) View Source (since 1.8.0)
now(Calendar.time_zone(), Calendar.time_zone_database()) ::
  {:ok, t()} | {:error, :time_zone_not_found | :utc_only_time_zone_database}

Returns the current datetime in the provided time zone.

By default, it uses the default time_zone returned by Calendar.get_time_zone_database/0, which defaults to Calendar.UTCOnlyTimeZoneDatabase which only handles "Etc/UTC" datetimes. Other time zone databases can be passed as argument or set globally. See the "Time zone database" section in the module docs.

Examples

iex> {:ok, datetime} = DateTime.now("Etc/UTC")
iex> datetime.time_zone
"Etc/UTC"
iex> DateTime.now("Europe/Copenhagen")
{:error, :utc_only_time_zone_database}
iex> DateTime.now("not a real time zone name", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
{:error, :time_zone_not_found}
Link to this function

shift_zone(datetime, time_zone, time_zone_database \\ Calendar.get_time_zone_database()) View Source (since 1.8.0)
shift_zone(t(), Calendar.time_zone(), Calendar.time_zone_database()) ::
  {:ok, t()} | {:error, :time_zone_not_found | :utc_only_time_zone_database}

Changes the time zone of a DateTime.

Returns a DateTime for the same point in time, but instead at the time zone provided. It assumes that DateTime is valid and exists in the given time zone and calendar.

By default, it uses the default time zone database returned by Calendar.get_time_zone_database/0, which defaults to Calendar.UTCOnlyTimeZoneDatabase which only handles "Etc/UTC" datetimes. Other time zone databases can be passed as argument or set globally. See the "Time zone database" section in the module docs.

Examples

iex> cph_datetime = DateTime.from_naive!(~N[2018-07-16 12:00:00], "Europe/Copenhagen", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> {:ok, pacific_datetime} = DateTime.shift_zone(cph_datetime, "America/Los_Angeles", FakeTimeZoneDatabase)
iex> pacific_datetime
#DateTime<2018-07-16 03:00:00-07:00 PDT America/Los_Angeles>

Converts a DateTime into a Date.

Because Date does not hold time nor time zone information, data will be lost during the conversion.

Examples

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.to_date(dt)
~D[2000-02-29]
Link to this function

to_iso8601(datetime, format \\ :extended) View Source
to_iso8601(Calendar.datetime(), :extended | :basic) :: String.t()

Converts the given datetime to ISO 8601:2004 format.

By default, DateTime.to_iso8601/2 returns datetimes formatted in the "extended" format, for human readability. It also supports the "basic" format through passing the :basic option.

Only supports converting datetimes which are in the ISO calendar, attempting to convert datetimes from other calendars will raise.

WARNING: the ISO 8601 datetime format does not contain the time zone nor its abbreviation, which means information is lost when converting to such format.

Examples

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.to_iso8601(dt)
"2000-02-29T23:00:07+01:00"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "UTC",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 0, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Etc/UTC"}
iex> DateTime.to_iso8601(dt)
"2000-02-29T23:00:07Z"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> DateTime.to_iso8601(dt, :extended)
"2000-02-29T23:00:07-04:00"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> DateTime.to_iso8601(dt, :basic)
"20000229T230007-0400"

Converts the given datetime into a NaiveDateTime.

Because NaiveDateTime does not hold time zone information, any time zone related data will be lost during the conversion.

Examples

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 1},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.to_naive(dt)
~N[2000-02-29 23:00:07.0]

Converts the given datetime to a string according to its calendar.

Examples

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.to_string(dt)
"2000-02-29 23:00:07+01:00 CET Europe/Warsaw"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "UTC",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 0, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Etc/UTC"}
iex> DateTime.to_string(dt)
"2000-02-29 23:00:07Z"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "AMT",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: -14400, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "America/Manaus"}
iex> DateTime.to_string(dt)
"2000-02-29 23:00:07-04:00 AMT America/Manaus"

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: -100, month: 12, day: 19, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 3, minute: 20, second: 31, microsecond: {0, 0},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Stockholm"}
iex> DateTime.to_string(dt)
"-0100-12-19 03:20:31+01:00 CET Europe/Stockholm"

Converts a DateTime into Time.

Because Time does not hold date nor time zone information, data will be lost during the conversion.

Examples

iex> dt = %DateTime{year: 2000, month: 2, day: 29, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                hour: 23, minute: 0, second: 7, microsecond: {0, 1},
...>                utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Warsaw"}
iex> DateTime.to_time(dt)
~T[23:00:07.0]
Link to this function

to_unix(datetime, unit \\ :second) View Source

Converts the given datetime to Unix time.

The datetime is expected to be using the ISO calendar with a year greater than or equal to 0.

It will return the integer with the given unit, according to System.convert_time_unit/3.

Examples

iex> 1_464_096_368 |> DateTime.from_unix!() |> DateTime.to_unix()
1464096368

iex> dt = %DateTime{calendar: Calendar.ISO, day: 20, hour: 18, microsecond: {273806, 6},
...>                minute: 58, month: 11, second: 19, time_zone: "America/Montevideo",
...>                utc_offset: -10800, std_offset: 3600, year: 2014, zone_abbr: "UYST"}
iex> DateTime.to_unix(dt)
1416517099

iex> flamel = %DateTime{calendar: Calendar.ISO, day: 22, hour: 8, microsecond: {527771, 6},
...>                minute: 2, month: 3, second: 25, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Etc/UTC",
...>                utc_offset: 0, year: 1418, zone_abbr: "UTC"}
iex> DateTime.to_unix(flamel)
-17412508655
Link to this function

truncate(datetime, precision) View Source (since 1.6.0)
truncate(Calendar.datetime(), :microsecond | :millisecond | :second) :: t()

Returns the given datetime with the microsecond field truncated to the given precision (:microsecond, millisecond or :second).

The given datetime is returned unchanged if it already has lower precision than the given precision.

Examples

iex> dt1 = %DateTime{year: 2017, month: 11, day: 7, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                 hour: 11, minute: 45, second: 18, microsecond: {123456, 6},
...>                 utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Paris"}
iex> DateTime.truncate(dt1, :microsecond)
#DateTime<2017-11-07 11:45:18.123456+01:00 CET Europe/Paris>

iex> dt2 = %DateTime{year: 2017, month: 11, day: 7, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                 hour: 11, minute: 45, second: 18, microsecond: {123456, 6},
...>                 utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Paris"}
iex> DateTime.truncate(dt2, :millisecond)
#DateTime<2017-11-07 11:45:18.123+01:00 CET Europe/Paris>

iex> dt3 = %DateTime{year: 2017, month: 11, day: 7, zone_abbr: "CET",
...>                 hour: 11, minute: 45, second: 18, microsecond: {123456, 6},
...>                 utc_offset: 3600, std_offset: 0, time_zone: "Europe/Paris"}
iex> DateTime.truncate(dt3, :second)
#DateTime<2017-11-07 11:45:18+01:00 CET Europe/Paris>
Link to this function

utc_now(calendar \\ Calendar.ISO) View Source
utc_now(Calendar.calendar()) :: t()

Returns the current datetime in UTC.

Examples

iex> datetime = DateTime.utc_now()
iex> datetime.time_zone
"Etc/UTC"