Grizzly.ZWave.DSK (grizzly v0.22.2) View Source

Module for working with the SmartStart and S2 DSKs

Link to this section Summary

Types

The DSK binary is the elixir binary string form of the DSK

The DSK string is the string version of the DSK

t()

Functions

Take a binary representation of the DSK and change it into the string representation

Make a new DSK

Parse a textual representation of a DSK

Parse a DSK PIN

Take a string representation of the DSK and change it into the binary representation

Return the first five digits of a DSK for use as a PIN

Convert the DSK to a string

Generate a DSK that is all zeros

Link to this section Types

Specs

dsk_binary() :: <<_::128>>

The DSK binary is the elixir binary string form of the DSK

The format is <<b1, b2, b3, ... b16>>

That is 16 bytes.

An example of this would be:

<<196, 109, 73, 131, 38, 196, 119, 227, 62, 101, 131, 175, 15, 165, 14, 39>>

Specs

dsk_string() :: <<_::376>>

The DSK string is the string version of the DSK

The general format is XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX-XXXXX

That is 8 blocks of 16 bit integers separated by a dash.

An example of this would be 50285-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623

Specs

t() :: %Grizzly.ZWave.DSK{raw: <<_::128>>}

Link to this section Functions

Link to this function

binary_to_string(dsk_binary)

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Specs

binary_to_string(dsk_binary()) :: {:ok, dsk_string()}

Take a binary representation of the DSK and change it into the string representation

Specs

new(binary()) :: t()

Make a new DSK

If less than 16 bytes are passed in, the rest are initialized to zero. Due to how DSKs are constructed, odd length binaries aren't allowed since they should never be possible.

Specs

parse(dsk_string()) :: {:ok, t()} | {:error, :invalid_dsk}

Parse a textual representation of a DSK

Specs

parse_pin(String.t() | non_neg_integer()) :: {:ok, t()} | {:error, :invalid_dsk}

Parse a DSK PIN

PINs can also be parsed by parse/1. When working with PINs, though, it's nice to be more forgiving and accept PINs as integers or strings without leading zeros.

String examples:

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse_pin("12345"); dsk
#DSK<12345-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000>


iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse_pin("123"); dsk
#DSK<00123-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000>

Integer examples:

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse_pin(12345); dsk
#DSK<12345-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000>

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse_pin(123); dsk
#DSK<00123-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000-00000>
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string_to_binary(dsk_string)

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This function is deprecated. Use DSK.parse/1 instead.

Specs

string_to_binary(dsk_string()) :: {:ok, dsk_binary()} | {:error, :invalid_dsk}

Take a string representation of the DSK and change it into the binary representation

Specs

to_pin_string(t()) :: String.t()

Return the first five digits of a DSK for use as a PIN

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse("50285-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623")
iex> DSK.to_pin_string(dsk)
"50285"

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse("00001-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623")
iex> DSK.to_pin_string(dsk)
"00001"
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to_string(dsk, opts \\ [])

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Specs

to_string(t(), keyword()) :: String.t()

Convert the DSK to a string

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse("50285-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623")
iex> DSK.to_string(dsk)
"50285-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623"

iex> {:ok, dsk} = DSK.parse("50285-18819-09924-30691-15973-33711-04005-03623")
iex> DSK.to_string(dsk, delimiter: "")
"5028518819099243069115973337110400503623"

Options:

  • :delimiter - character to join the 5 byte sections together (default "-")

Specs

zeros() :: t()

Generate a DSK that is all zeros

This is useful for placeholder/default DSKs.